Sunday Reflections

33rd Sunday in Ordinary Time - November 18, 2018

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Father Jim Donohue

November 12, 2018

As we approach the end of the liturgical year, our Sunday readings point us to the end of time.  The reading from the Book of Daniel looks forward to an end for those faithful Jews who were persecuted by King Antiochus IV: “They shall live forever” and “shine brightly like the splendor of the firmament.”  Likewise, the reading from the Gospel of Mark reminds those faithful early Christians in Rome who were persecuted  that they “will see the Son of Man coming in the clouds with great power and glory,” who will “gather his elect from the four winds, from the ends of the earth




32nd Sunday in Ordinary Time - Sunday November 11, 2018

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Father Paul Voisin

November 8, 2018

Jesus has show us – by his life, and by his suffering, death and resurrection – what it means to give.  True giving, inspired by Christ is generous and unconditional.  This is not as easy to achieve as it sounds.  Our gospel today invites us to reflect on what kind of giver we are – a grudge giver, a duty giver, or a ‘thanks’ giver.  Just as the widow in the gospel gave all that she had, in complete confidence in God, we are called to be givers who truly give from the heart, giving of ourselves as faithful stewards of God’s abundant gifts. 

 




31st Sunday In Ordinary Time - November 4, 2018

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Father Jim Valk

November 4, 2018

Asking Jesus to name the greatest commandment is a trick question, for there were 613 laws (which included both the “written” laws and the “oral” laws).  Since this is the case, any one commandment that Jesus might pick could lead to a debate about what others might see as more important. However, Jesus surprises his questioners by combining a commandment from the Book of Deuteronomy and another from the Book of Leviticus in an answer that impresses his hearers. 




30th Sunday in Ordinary Time - Sunday, October 28, 2018

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Father Jim Donohue

October 28, 2018

            Last Sunday Jesus asked James and John a question: “What do you want me to do for you?”  In response, they asked for seats at his right and his left when he comes in glory.  Jesus had just finished telling the disciples that he was to go to Jerusalem where he would suffer and die before rising on the third day.  In response to news of Jesus’ impending death, James and John ask for seats of glory.  (It is worth pointing out that the other ten disciples are no better.  The gospel tells us that “they be




29th Sunday in Ordinary Time - Sunday, October 21, 2018

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Father Paul Voisin

October 16, 2018

Perseverance is a great virtue.  Many times in the world today we expect things to be done in a moment – just add water and stir.  Things of value are not acquired in a moment, but require a dedication and persistence.  We cannot give up, or give in, but persevere in responding to God and doing his will.  The persistence of the widow in the gospel today calls us to also be persevering in our prayer before God.  We may see ourselves as “pestering” God, but many times our perseverance is the means by which our prayer is purified, that we go from telling God how to ans




28th Sunday In Ordinary Time - Sunday, October 14, 2018

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Father Jim Valk

October 11, 2018

It is interesting that in the Gospel, the rich young man seems to have things in order concerning his relationships with others. He seems to be keeping the last seven commandments well.  But, he makes no mention of his following the first three commandments that we usually understand to be connected with our relationship with God.  Jesus understands this and realizes that this young man, who is rich, has put others things before his relationship with God. This is why Jesus tells him that he must leave all behind.




26th Sunday in Ordinary Time - Sunday, September 30, 2018

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Father Paul Voisin

September 24, 2018

It is only natural that we prefer ‘good’ news over ‘bad news’.  Jesus came to give ‘good news’, as he was the Good News.  Yet, at times, he brought what appeared to be ‘bad news’.  He challenged his listeners, he warned against sin and evil, and he condemned the actions of many.  There is a price to pay with the ‘bad news’, calling us to change and transformation through the power of God’s grace.  If we are deaf to the ‘bad news’ we continue in our sin and separate ourselves from God, and fall out of harmony with others.  Through God’s grace the ‘bad news’ is t




25th Sunday in Ordinary Time - Sunday, September 23, 2018

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Father Jim Valk

September 18, 2018

A wife was married to a man who was a full sized egotist. Every action was a sign of his egotism, always better than someone else. He was the greatest, at least in his own eyes. No matter what the wife would do, or would try to fix, he was # one. One day, at the circus, he decided to tell his wife that he was going to weigh himself. What a “diagnosis” he got! The machine said he was charming, intelligent, sexy, a magnetic personality. “Well,” said the egotist, “what do you think of that? It sees me as I am”.




24th Sunday In Ordinary Time - Sunday, September 16, 2018

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Father Jim Donohue

September 10, 2018

The disciples, especially in the person of Peter, do not want to hear about Jesus’ future suffering and death when Jesus talks to them about what will happen to him in Jerusalem. Peter’s criticism of Jesus—rebuking Jesus for what He has said—stands in defiance of Jesus’ own acceptance of the path of suffering that is characterized so clearly in our first reading. Here we meet the “suffering servant” of Isaiah, who is willing to accept the scorn and humiliations imposed on him by others as he remains faithful to God’s call for him.




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